semidetached semidetached
*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« en: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:00:02 »
Cover boys Muse may have built their success on unorthodox musical approaches, but on the band’s latest album, Black Holes and Revelations, they adopted the industry standard. Find out why the band scrapped their tape of basic tracks in favor of Pro Tools, and why VENUE is the choice on stage.

digizine




It might seem slightly twisted to launch into a story on one of the UK’s most futuristic rock bands by conjuring up the early ‘60s instrumental work of the Tornados — the Joe Meek –produced quintet whose quirky lounge classic “Telstar” was an international hit — but in Matt Bellamy’s case, the reference is more than apt. “My dad was in that band,” says the dynamic lead singer of Muse, “and for the time, their music was quite forward-thinking. Of course, now that we listen back to it, sometimes it reminds you of a sci-fi B-movie from back then, you know? I was trying to capture a little bit of that retro sci-fi mood with some of the songs on this album.”

The album, Black Holes and Revelations (Warner Bros.), marks the first time that Muse has committed fully to the processing power of Pro Tools|HD. And while the band — Bellamy (who also plays guitars and keyboards), Chris Wolstenholme (bass and backing vocals), and Dominic Howard (drums) — still rely on a wealth of analog outboard gear and vintage synths to harness their lush, multi-layered sonic experience, they’ve also found a new source of creative freedom in the digital domain. From Pro Tools in the studio to Digidesign’s VENUE system on stage, the latest mission of Muse is all about exploring fresh possibilities in sound.


APPROACHING WARP SPEED

“This was a very demanding album in terms of what we needed from our equipment,” Bellamy says. “I think if we were working only with tape like we did on the first album [Showbiz, 1999], we’d probably still be working on it now.”

Unlike the last three Muse albums, virtually every song on Black Holes and Revelations required a different production approach, from the stripped-down intimacy of the dreamy ballad “Soldier’s Poem” to the glam-rock aggression of “Starlight.” Meanwhile, constant changes in locale — five studios in four countries for tracking and mixing, over a period of about seven months — only added to the complexity of the project. For the band and producer Rich Costey, this meant that work had to proceed quickly and efficiently, regardless of the capabilities of the studio they were in.

“The first studio we worked at was Miraval in France,” recalls Costey, who co-produced and mixed the band’s last album Absolution, and has worked with an A-list of artists that includes Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave, Franz Ferdinand, the Mars Volta, and Mastodon. (Costey also got an early start on Pro Tools during his tenure with composer Philip Glass at Looking Glass Studios, beginning in 1996.) “We started off using tape a little bit, where we would record basic tracks on analog and then edit them in Pro Tools. But that process took a long time; the studio was great, but it was difficult to get things done very quickly. We ended up just scrapping the tape so we could work faster, which is why most of the album was just recorded straight into Pro Tools.”

Eventually the band came to New York for the bulk of their multi-tracking sessions at Avatar and Electric Lady. When they headed back to Europe to record a string section and begin vocal overdubs and lead retakes, Bellamy decided to expedite the process even further by having his own portable Pro Tools|HD rig — complete with a custom-built flight case — sent to Office Meccaniche Studios in Milan, Italy.

“That was where the portability was very important,” Bellamy says, “because I did some work at home and in a couple of different studios in Milan. By having the flight case made, that obviously guarantees that we can move around with Pro Tools to wherever we want. I just have to plug in a monitor and a mouse and we’re off.”

For Costey, the additional setup was also a crucial time-saver, especially when he began preparing for the mixing phase. “We ended up having two rooms going,” he explains, “so Matt was able to do quite a lot of vocals. He’d set up the track, get in the vocal booth and do a take, and then walk back into the other room and hit stop. Over the holiday break, he would upload MP3s for me to listen to and we would sort through those together. Chris was also punching in some of his own background vocals — just working by himself until he had the sound he wanted. I think enabling the artists themselves to do stuff like that on their own time is a big step because it keeps everybody engaged in the creative process.”


MANY WORLDS THEORY

Having chosen Pro Tools as their primary tracking medium, the members of Muse took full advantage of the program’s capacity. Dense layers of vocals in the style of vintage Freddie Mercury and Queen (the operatic rock chorus of “Supermassive Black Hole” being a prime example) are the most noticeable result, while the seamlessly stacked musical strata of songs like “Exo-Politics” — a multi-hued mixture of heavy guitars and bass, pounding drums, and strange synth washes from an ARP 2600, EMS Synthi, and Buchla modular — display the band’s use of Pro Tools as a compositional enabler.

“That song went in several different directions,” Costey explains, “which wouldn’t have happened without Pro Tools. To start we tried it with a traditional band sound, then we took it in another direction where it was all synthesizers, and then another where it was just weird effects. The final version ended up being an amalgam of all three, and I think it’s a much richer song because of it. We’re basically using Pro Tools to arrange and compose — and we can re-approach and re-arrange the same song without having any fear of losing what we started with.”

A similar tactic propelled the final version of “Starlight,” which went through several stylistic interpretations before Bellamy tackled the lead vocal. “It wasn’t until I actually came in to record it,” he explains, “that I automatically felt like the song was pulling me towards a more aggressive tone than the take I was listening to. Fortunately we had all the different-styled takes layered on top of each other, and we were able to pull up a much more aggressive drum take, with more aggressive bass and guitars going with that, and that helped me do the vocal. We don’t do that kind of mixing and matching a lot — normally we’re quite committed to an arrangement before we even start recording — but I suppose the freedom of Pro Tools led us to what worked.”

The same held true when it came to grouping and mixing the album’s backing vocals. Costey takes “Soldier’s Poem” as a case in point. “Both Matt and Chris sang on that song,” he says, “and there were quite a lot of vocals laid down, so we would just comp and choose which takes were the best. We had them on different playlists, and that sort of thing is much easier to do in Pro Tools.”

Costey usually does submixes of the vocal groups that will become part of the final mix, and then bounces them to half-inch tape. “I’m quite a big fan of tape saturation,” he says, referring to the “cohesive” effect of analog tape, “as well as analog delays like the Echoplex and Binson, which we used on a lot of vocal treatments.” From the tape machine, the vocals would be flown back into the computer and then offset to fix any latency issues. “It doesn’t sound all that glorious,” Costey jokes of the technique, “but Pro Tools really helped us out in our ability to comp between a multitude of vocal takes, and to streamline all the analog processing.”

Of course, the key to having access to so much processing power is knowing when to stop. “When you’re first presented with the freedom of what you can do with Pro Tools, sometimes you can go too far and end up surrounding yourself with a big mess,” Bellamy laughs. “But in working with Rich, I think we’ve only really done the excessive layering when we thought it was definitely worth it.”


FIX IT IN THE MIX
       
According to Costey, effects automation and DigiRack plug-ins played a significant role in the mixing process. “Even though I’m into analog gear, I still use a fair amount of effects plug-ins,” Costey reveals. “Most of the time, if you want something that’s got a little more style to it, you have to automate that; either you just do a move and print it back into Pro Tools, and have it run a printed effects track, or you automate the effect in Pro Tools, which is obviously the easier way to do it in most cases. During mixdown, we used a fair bit of filtering and delay automation in Pro Tools.”

“City of Delusion,” with its live string section, offered one of many instances where simple EQ adjustments solved the problem of making a clean, acoustically recorded part sit comfortably among its electric counterparts in the mix. “I do a lot of filtering on the low frequencies to clear out the bottom end,” Costey says. “I think that generates a lot of space, because some instruments tend to take up bottom end that you can’t hear — it’s sort of the dark matter that gets in the way of everything. To do that, the [DigiRack] one-band EQ is a pretty exact filter. I find the digital EQs to be really useful.”

True to his analog roots — and to the overall band aesthetic of Muse, who prefer to base their music around as much uninterrupted (and thus unedited) live performance as possible — Costey tries to avoid any edits in mixdown if he can. “You really notice it in the drums,” he says. “People sometimes edit the drums without regard to individual style, and they’ll let the grid determine how that player plays. And that’s really just pushing a simulation of something else — you’re getting no clue as to what the core of that band really is. I think bands become great when their idiosyncrasies are still apparent within their performance. That’s certainly the case with Matt, Chris, and Dom, which is why we have such a good working relationship.”


ENERGY TRANSFER

After more than ten years together as a live unit, Muse have established a solid reputation for kicking out the jams with sincerity when they take the stage. In their quest to remain true to the almost psychoactive energy they deliver on record, they’ve recently turned to Digidesign’s VENUE system while on tour.

“We started using it in Europe for a string of headline festivals,” explains FOH engineer Marc “MC” Carolan, who works out of Dublin’s Suite Studio. “It was a real unique way to start working with the [D-Show] board, but I’ve used it previously when I was out with the Cure, so I was quite comfortable with it. What I like is that you can choose your level of where you want to operate — it can be simple or complicated stuff.”

With a typical Muse show requiring 40-plus inputs to the board, as well as the use of various plug-ins to help emulate certain sounds from the band’s albums, the gig does have its complexities, but as Carolan describes it, VENUE makes everything a breeze. “I can basically operate on eight master faders in the center section of the board, even though we’re running all those inputs,” he says. “In a festival situation, it’s good to be able to just glance and see immediately what’s going on [with the mix].”

Although he comes from the old school of live sound engineering, where it seemed like the job was more often about solving problems than pursuing a real interactive role with the band, Carolan is impressed with the artistic vistas offered by the VENUE system. “We have a lot of distorted vocals going on,” he points out by way of example, “and the EQ III [plug-in] really lets me get in there to work on that. And with the Dynamics III [plug-in], you can really focus the control of the drums. So this is a lot more creative than just trouble-shooting; it’s about the ability to mix and match different sounds, which is a really powerful thing to me.”

Carolan is confident that he’s delivering a Muse-worthy sound; not only does the band get a liberal taste of it through their monitor mix (also routed through a VENUE console), but they’ve reacted positively to the live mixes — all recorded to

Pro Tools|HD — that he puts up for line checks hours before a show begins. “We’re still developing the show,” he concedes, “and the band brings a different energy every time with their live performances, so there’s that dynamic to it as well. But they’re quite exacting with what they want, and the VENUE
has allowed me to meet that demand.”


Bill Murphy is a regular contributor to Remix, Future Music, and Guitar World’s Bass Guitar magazines. He is currently working with Teo Macero on the legendary Columbia producer’s upcoming biography.
« última modificación: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:04:01 por deborah X »
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado NyoKa

  • 339
  • 5
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #1 en: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:13:40 »
 :eek Joer, que pereza da leerse todo esto ahora!!!!!

P.D. Ya que te pones lo podias haber traducido xD xD

*

Desconectado NyoKa

  • 339
  • 5
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #2 en: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:19:12 »
¿¿Tornados??  ¿¿¿“My dad was in that band”???  :eek
No habia oido nombrar a ese grupo en la vida. Es cierto lo de su padre??

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #3 en: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:24:45 »
Claro que es cierto :p En su época tuvieron éxito y todo :) Igual me curro un hilo sobre ellos
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado NyoKa

  • 339
  • 5
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #4 en: Mié, 13 de Dic del 2006, a las 23:06:53 »
Veo que ya lo has hecho  :lol:

*

Desconectado Dan_Kawaguchi

  • El Friki 07/12 Un lustro en la cima.
  • 4743
  • 39
  • Agent of Chaos
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #5 en: Jue, 14 de Dic del 2006, a las 15:16:19 »
P.D. Ya que te pones lo podias haber traducido xD xD

Seguro que su traducción haría al artículo mucho más interesante(y divertido xD)

*

Desconectado Mozz

  • La que flodea 07, pero con encanto 07
  • 3486
  • 21
  • amonia de party!
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #6 en: Jue, 14 de Dic del 2006, a las 22:58:10 »
Seguro que su traducción haría al artículo mucho más interesante(y divertido xD)
Y tb lo leería más gente.. xD

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #7 en: Jue, 14 de Dic del 2006, a las 23:20:04 »
Lo reconozco, es algo tostón leerse todo eso. Pero traducirlo debe ser como 20 veces peor xD Si los días tuvieran 50 horas...

Os lo resumo en 2 palabras: pro tools mola bajadlo  :cheesy:
« última modificación: Jue, 14 de Dic del 2006, a las 23:21:36 por deborah X »
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado Fer

  • 1411
  • 154
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #8 en: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:14:18 »
Pro Tools es la ostia en bicicleta si conseguis bajarlo con crack y todo y lo instalais, lo vais a desinstalar al poco rato. Es muuuu profesional.

Visitad la web que por fin está en apañol: http://www.digidesign.com/index.cfm?
Se me cae la baborra con lo que se ve aquí.

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #9 en: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 00:25:44 »
si conseguis bajarlo con crack y todo y lo instalais, lo vais a desinstalar al poco rato. Es muuuu profesional.
xD xD xD a mí sinceramente, me acojona  :laugh:
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado Geles

  • 2424
  • 208
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #10 en: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 17:38:11 »
Lo reconozco, es algo tostón leerse todo eso. Pero traducirlo debe ser como 20 veces peor xD

Y que lo digas  :juas

Ahí va la traducción. Leedla, por diooossss, porque me he tirado media mañana y media tarde haciéndolaaaaa!!!  :gangrena xD

Nota: tecnicismos yo no saber  :unsure:

Patrocinado por Pro Tools  :tongue:  xD

Los chicos de Muse han construido su éxito sobre enfoques musicales heterodoxos, pero en el último album de la banda, Black Holes and Revelations, adoptaron el estándar industrial. Descubre por qué la banda desechó la cinta magnética de pistas básicas en favor de Pro Tools, y por qué han escogido el sistema Venue para el escenario.

Podría parecer un poco retorcido empezar la historia de una de las bandas británicas de rock más futuristas evocando la obra instrumental de The Tornados en los 60 -el quinteto producido por Joe Meek, cuyo estrafalario tema de salón Telstar fue un éxito internacional- pero en el caso de Bellamy, la referencia es más que acertada. "Mi padre estaba en esa banda", dice el dinámico cantante y líder de Muse, "y para la época, su música era bastante adelantada. Por supuesto, ahora lo escuchamos y a veces te recuerda a una película de ciencia ficción de serie B. Intentaba capturar un poco de ese aire retro de ciencia ficción en alguna de las canciones de este disco".

El album, Black Holes and Revelations (Warner), es la primera vez que Muse se han metido de lleno en el poder procesador de Pro Tools HD. Y mientras la banda -Bellamy (que también toca la guitarra y el teclado), Chris Wolstenholme (bajo y coros), y Dominic Howard (batería)- todavía confía en el equipo analógico y en los sintetizadores antiguos para aprovechar su opulenta/exuberante experiencia multi-capa (?), también han encontrado una nueva fuente de libertad creativa en el dominio digital. Desde Pro Tools en el estudio al sistema Venue de Digidesign en escena, la última misión de Muse es explorar nuevas posibilidades en sonido.

APPROACHING WARP SPEED (?)

"Éste es un disco muy exigente en cuanto a lo que necesitábamos de nuestro equipo", dice Bellamy. "Creo que si trabajáramos sólo con cinta magnética como hicimos en nuestro primer disco (Showbiz, 1999), ahora probablemente estaríamos todavía trabajando en él".

A diferencia de los tres últimos discos, casi todas las canciones de Black Holes and Revelations requirieron un enfoque de producción diferente, desde la intimidad desnuda de la balada soñadora Soldier's Poem, a la agresividad glam-rock de Starlight. Mientras tanto, los constantes cambios de local -cinco estudios en cuatro países para grabar y mezclar, durante un periodo de aproximadamente siete meses- no hicieron más que sumarse a la complejidad del proyecto. Para la banda y el productor Rich Costey, ésto significó tener que trabajar rápida y eficientemente, sin tener en cuenta los recursos del estudio donde estaban.

"El primer estudio donde trabajamos fue Miraval, en Francia", recuerda Costey, que coprodujo y mezcló el último disco de la banda, Absolution, y ha trabajado con una lista de artistas sobresalientes que incluye Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave, Franz Ferdinand, The Mars Volta y Mastodon (Costey también empezó pronto con Pro Tools cuando trabajó con Philip Glass en los estudios Looking Glass, inaugurados en 1996). "Empezamos usando cinta magnética, en la que grabábamos canciones básicas en analógico y luego editábamos en Pro Tools. Pero ese proceso llevaba mucho tiempo; el estudio era genial, pero era difícil terminar las cosas rápidamente. Terminamos por desechar la cinta magnética para poder trabajar más rápido, que es por lo que la mayor parte del disco fue grabada directamente en Pro Tools."

Finalmente la banda se fue a Nueva York con la mayoría de sus sesiones multi-pista en Avatar y Electric Lady. Cuando volvieron a Europa para grabar una sección de cuerda y empezar con las voces y tomas solistas, Bellamy decidió acelerar el proceso aún más con su propio Pro Tools HD portátil (al que ha construido una maleta especial para transportarlo en avión), enviado a los estudios Office Meccaniche en Milán, Italia.

"Ahí fue donde la portabilidad era muy importante", dice Bellamy, "porque hice cosas en casa y en un par de estudios en Milán. Tener la maleta garantiza poder movernos con el Pro Tools allá donde queramos. Sólo tengo que enchufarlo a un monitor y a un ratón y a funcionar (jjjjj)".

Para Costey, la configuración adicional también ahorró tiempo, especialmente cuando empezó a preparar la fase de mezclas. "Acabamos teniendo dos salas funcionando", explica, "así que Matt pudo hacer muchos vocales. Preparaba la pista, se metía en la cabina y hacía una toma, y luego volvía a la otra sala y lo paraba. Durante las vacaciones, me enviaba mp3 para escucharlos y revisarlos. Chris también remató algunos de sus coros -trabajaba solo hasta que conseguía el sonido que quería. Creo que animar a los artistas a que hagan cosas así, cuando quieran, es un gran avance, porque nos mantiene a todos unidos en el proceso creativo".

LA TEORÍA DE LOS MUNDOS

Habiendo elegido Pro Tools como su medio de grabación primordial, los miembros de Muse aprovecharon al máximo la capacidad del programa. Las densas pistas vocales al estilo Freddie Mercury y Queen (los coros operísticos de Supermassive Black Hole, por ejemplo) son el resultado más notable, mientras que las bases musicales, limpiamente unidas, de canciones como Exo-Politics -una mezcla multiforme de guitarras y bajos metal, percusión machacona, y extrañas estelas de un sintetizador ARP 2600, EMS Synthi, y Buchla modular- demuestran que la banda ha usado Pro Tools como herramienta de composición.

"Esa canción iba en muchas direcciones distintas", explica Costey, "lo cual no hubiera ocurrido sin Pro Tools. Para empezar, probamos con el sonido tradicional de la banda, luego la llevamos a otra dirección en la que todo eran sintetizadores, y luego a otra en la que eran todo efectos raros. La versión final terminó siendo una amalgama de las tres, y creo que es una canción mucho más rica por ello. Básicamente estamos usando Pro Tools para arreglar y componer -y podemos revisar y arreglar la misma canción sin miedo a perder lo que teníamos al principio".

Una táctica similar impulsó la versión final de Starlight, que atravesó por numerosas interpretaciones estilísticas antes de que Bellamy abordara la voz solista. "No sentí que la canción me empujaba hacia un tono más agresivo que el que estaba escuchando hasta que me metí a grabarla", explica. "Afortunadamente teníamos todas las diferentes tomas unas encima de otras, y pudimos sacar una toma de percusión mucho más agresiva, con un bajo y unas guitarras más agresivos, y éso me ayudó con la voz. No hacemos mucho ese tipo de mezcla -normalmente hacemos un arreglo incluso antes de empezar a grabar- pero supongo que la libertad del Pro Tools nos llevó a lo que funcionaba".

Lo mismo se hizo realidad cuando tocó agrupar y mezclar los coros del disco. Costey toma como ejemplo Soldier's Poem. "Tanto Matt como Chris cantan en esa canción", dice, "y había muchas voces, así que simplemente escogimos qué tomas eran las mejores. Las teníamos en listas de reproducción distintas, y éso es mucho más fácil de hacer con Pro Tools". 

Costey normalmente hace submixes de los grupos vocales que formarán parte de la mezcla final, y luego los pasa a cinta magnética de media pulgada. "Me gusta mucho la saturación de la cinta", dice, refiriéndose al efecto "unificador" de la cinta analógica, "así como los retardos analógicos como el Echoplex y Binson, que usamos en muchos tratamientos vocales". Las voces irían del magnetófono al ordenador, y luego serían compensadas para arreglar cualquier problema de latencia. "No suena tan glorioso", bromea Costey sobre la técnica, "pero Pro Tools nos ayudó de verdad a la hora de escoger entre una multitud de tomas vocales, y a racionalizar todo el proceso analógico".

Por supuesto, la clave para tener acceso a tanto poder de procesamiento es saber dónde parar. "Cuando te enseñan la libertad con la que puedes trabajar con Pro Tools, a veces puedes ir demasiado lejos y terminar rodeado de un gran caos", se ríe Bellamy. "Pero trabajando con Rich, creo que realmente sólo hemos usado un exceso de capas (?) cuando hemos pensado que definitivamente merecía la pena".

ARREGLOS EN LAS MEZCLAS

Según Costey, la automatización de los efectos y los plug-ins de DigiRack jugaron un papel significativo en el proceso de mezcla. "Aunque conozco el equipo analógico, todavía uso un montón de plug-ins de efectos", revela Costey. "La mayoría de las veces, si quieres algo que tenga un poco más de estilo, tienes que automatizarlo; bien haces un cambio simplemente y lo devuelves a Pro Tools y lo tienes como una pista de efectos, o bien automatizas el efecto en Pro Tools, lo cual es obviamente la manera más fácil de hacerlo en la mayoría de los casos. Durante la mezcla usamos bastantes filtros y automatización de retardos en Pro Tools".

City of Delusion, con su sección de cuerda en directo, fue uno de los muchos ejemplos en que los simples ajustes de ecualización solucionaban el problema de hacer que una parte grabada acústicamente se asiente cómodamente entre sus equivalentes eléctricos en la mezcla. "Filtro mucho las frecuencias bajas para aclarar el fondo final", dice Costey. "Creo que genera mucho espacio, porque algunos instrumentos tienden a ocupar el fondo que no puedes oír -algo así como la materia oscura que se mete en todas partes. Para hacer éso, la ecualización a una banda (de DigiRack) es un filtro bastante exacto. Encuentro realmente útil la ecualización digital".

De acuerdo con sus raíces analógicas -y con la estética de Muse en general, que prefieren basar su música en el directo, sin interrupción y sin editar, pues- Costey intenta evitar ediciones en las mezclas si puede. "La gente a veces edita la percusión sin tener en cuenta el estilo individual y deja que la cuadrícula (??) determine cómo toca el músico. Y éso sólo es hacer una simulación -no tienes ni idea de cuál es realmente la esencia de una banda. Creo que las bandas se hacen grandes cuando su idiosincrasia es visible en su actuación". Ese es precisamente el caso de Matt, Chris y Dom, y es por lo que tenemos una relación profesional tan buena".

TRANSFERENCIA DE ENERGÍA

Después de más de diez años tocando juntos, Muse han conseguido una sólida reputación siendo sinceros en el escenario. En su empeño por mantener esa sinceridad en la casi psicoactiva energía que despliegan en el disco, han optado por el sistema Venue de Digidesign para la gira.

"Empezamos a usarlo en Europa para una serie de festivales (como cabeza de cartel)", explica el ingeniero de FOH Marc "MC" Carolan, que trabaja en el Suite Studio de Dublín. "Fue realmente una manera única de empezar a trabajar con la consola D-Show, pero la he usado previamente con The Cure, así que me encontraba bastante cómodo con ella. Lo que me gusta es que puedes escoger tu nivel de dónde quieres operar -pueden ser cosas simples o complicadas".

Con un show típico de Muse, que requiere más de cuarenta entradas a la consola, así como usar varios plug-ins para emular ciertos sonidos de los discos, el concierto realmente tiene sus complejidades, pero como lo describe Carolan, Venue lo convierte todo en una brisa. "Básicamente puedo operar en ocho faders maestros en la sección central de la consola, incluso cuando todas esas entradas están funcionando", dice. "En un festival, es bueno poder echar un vistazo y ver inmediatamente lo que está pasando (con la mezcla)".

Carolan confía en estar entregando un sonido a la altura de Muse; la banda no sólo obtiene una percepción liberal de él a través de la mezcla en los monitores (?) (también enrutados a la consola Venue), sino que ha reaccionado positivamente a las mezclas en directo -todas grabadas en Pro Tools HD- que monta para las pruebas previas al show. "Todavía estamos desarrollando el espectáculo", admite, "y la banda transmite una energía diferente cada vez con sus actuaciones, así que existe esa dinámica también. Pero son bastante precisos con lo que quieren, y el sistema Venue me ha permitido conseguir lo que querían".
« última modificación: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 19:29:51 por frikimuza »

*

Desconectado Mozz

  • La que flodea 07, pero con encanto 07
  • 3486
  • 21
  • amonia de party!
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #11 en: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 19:00:49 »
Mil gracias, Geles  ^^ Ya me lo bajaré... un día de estos... xD

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #12 en: Vie, 15 de Dic del 2006, a las 22:15:13 »
No me lo puedo de creer mari geles xD Mete tu traducción en un artículo y así inauguramos la sección de entrevistas  :wink:

madre mía qué de curro  :cheesy:
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado Dan_Kawaguchi

  • El Friki 07/12 Un lustro en la cima.
  • 4743
  • 39
  • Agent of Chaos
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #13 en: Lun, 18 de Dic del 2006, a las 17:53:28 »
Adoremos todos a Geles por su gran sacrificio...

*se arrodilla*

Te adoraaaaamos,Geles....

Muy buen trabajo,sin duda...ahora estoy obligado moralmente a leermelo :cheesy:

*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Re: MUSE en DigiZine - Aspectos técnicos de la grabación de BH&R y de la gira
« Respuesta #14 en: Lun, 18 de Dic del 2006, a las 20:59:02 »
Que curre de traducción wapa, ahora sí he podido leerlo xD muchas gracias ^^

 

TinyPortal © 2005-2012