semidetached semidetached
*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Innocence and Absolution
« en: Dom, 21 de Ene del 2007, a las 22:22:13 »
Los que tocáis el piano seguro que os interesa bastante ^^

-------------



June 2005

Blending a natural talent for melody and harmony with an engaging sense of mystery and storytelling, Matt Bellamy puts the piano up front.

The lights dim at Phoenix’s Marquee Theater and the crowd roars in anticipation as a silhouetted trio takes the stage. As the opening chords of “Apocalypse Please” ring out, the audience sings along, enraptured. For the English band Muse, the adulation of the crowd is not unexpected yet hugely appreciated. Their third album, Absolution, has been a worldwide smash, exposing them to an ever-widening audience.

Muse is a true power trio, and Matt Bellamy’s third of the stage is filled with his guitar and keyboard rig, the latter looming like a metal pyramid next to the drum riser. As he rocks out on his Kawai MP9500, MIDI-controlled lights in the front of the rig create a visual spectacle that matches his torrid keyboard playing. And he’s equally gifted as a guitarist. The sheer energy he unleashes on both instruments, combined with his cathartic vocals and lyrics, leaves fans amazed and marveling that three people can create such a gigantic sound.

They didn’t set out with a vision of such success, however. Bellamy describes the early days of the band as being typical of schoolkids anywhere, forming bands and playing gigs to beat the boredom of life in a small town. At first, he just played guitar in the band, playing a combination of originals and covers. They started the band under the name Rocket Baby Dolls, and Bellamy describes them as “looking like the Cure, but sounding like Rush. Call it progressive goth.” It was mainly an instrumental band, but after winning a contentious Battle of the Bands contest and getting a good response from the judges, they began to focus more on songwriting. “We wrote hundreds of songs,” he says, “but it wasn’t until I was 18 or 19 when I began to express myself more and be more confident to do that. I wound up as the lead singer by default. There was no one else in the town that wanted to sing. Back then, it wasn’t really cool to sing falsetto because Nirvana and all that stuff was in. We saw Jeff Buckley do a concert, though, and he wasn’t scared to be a high-voiced male. I think that helped me open up and not be afraid to use a more expressive and emotional vocal style.”

Some would argue that Bellamy has mastered his craft as writer, singer, and player, and his growing legions of adoring fans are testimony to his well-crafted melodies and hooks. As Muse continues to tour the world and gain wider recognition, Bellamy and his band are enjoying the ride and the adulation. But at heart, these three guys from the tiny burg of Teignmouth are in it purely for the love of the music, and it shows. Keyboard went backstage at the Marquee, where Bellamy told us Muse’s story and parted the curtain on the band’s ethos and working methods.

What’s your piano story?
Piano was the first instrument I really played. I didn’t have any lessons, and though I tinkered with it since I was five, I didn’t really get interested until I was ten or 11. My dad used to play a lot of blues records, Ray Charles, and Stevie Wonder. Ray Charles was the one that stuck out; I used to work on my left hand to “What’d I Say” in sort of this boogie-woogie style. I spent ages working that out, practicing the left hand doing one thing and trying to do chords with the right hand. I went into a talent contest and played a solo version of that piece and actually won the contest. My older brother forced me into this talent contest and, though I was too nervous to do it, I did it anyway. It made me want to get out there and get some gigs and get in a band. When I first got into a band when I was about 13 or 14, I didn’t play piano for about six years because I just got so into the guitar.

It wasn’t until we came to record our first album, Showbiz, that I got back into piano. We were working on a song called “Sunburn,” which is kind of a strummy guitar song. It sounded a bit weak, and since it was one of my favorite songs, I wanted to make it sound good. So that was when John Leckie, our producer, had this idea to work out the guitar part on the piano. That was the first time I played piano in years it seems, and I had to spend two or three days just practicing “Sunburn,” which is a pretty simple part. When we recorded it, it sounded a bit like a Philip Glass film soundtrack. I think at that point I decided I’d get back into piano again. From that point on, I went in the opposite direction and started intensively working on piano and the guitar became more just for the live thing. I’d say 70 to 80 percent of the songs I’ve written since then have been written on piano. Even though live, I play some of them on guitar. Even a song like “Stockholm Syndrome” was written on piano.

I find it easy to find interesting chords on the piano. Especially because on a lot of stuff we do, the guitar and bass are harmonizing; I’m not just playing power chords and Chris [Wolstenholme, bassist] isn’t just playing root notes.

What music did you listen to for inspiration?
I started to look into classical music and people like Philip Glass. From listening to stuff, I found out that I didn’t really like the “proper classical” stuff from around 1750, like Mozart and all that. But with Philip Glass, his music has a lot of mystery. That was my introduction to discovering that side of music, the kind of abstract nature of music that has no lyrics and no title. With Rachmaninoff, Lizst, and Chopin, there’s a mystery to the music, it’s much more abstract and much more able to stimulate your imagination, I think. For me, that was something I had never discovered in music. I was about 19 or 20 by then.

So rather than learning pieces, you were soaking up the flavor of it.
Yeah. I knew it was too late for me to really catch up to that level of technique to play those kinds of pieces. But I just wanted to try and incorporate that kind of mystery into the band. And something that has had such an emotional resonance through history that it’s managed to live nearly two hundred years. I think a little bit of that started to creep through the second album, Origin of Symmetry, and then the new album as well.

I’m not really sure how much further we can go with that. There are a couple of songs that I’m working on now that are along those lines. One song that really shows that is on the second album, a song called “Space Dementia.” I always wanted to make a heavy rock song that could just have a piano without a guitar. I think we got there again on “Butterflies and Hurricanes” on the new album. I was trying to find a classical type of piano style that would be heavy and work with bass and drums. It had that sort of mechanical paradiddle thing all the way through, and then it breaks down into this kind of romantic, flowing weird bit in the middle.

When you were writing “Butterflies and Hurricanes,” were you consciously trying to create the breakdown or did it happen naturally?
It was part of the whole concept to make it mechanical. I wrote it on the piano and originally, I didn’t know how we were going to get the bass and drums to work with it. Steve Reich did that kind of really intensive, repetitive piano stuff with his piece, “In C.” I wanted to do that and then break into a really emotional thing. It’s really about that, the contrast between the two bits. The challenge was getting it to work with the bass and drums.

A lot of your songwriting doesn’t adhere to normal song structure. What inspires you to write outside the box?
In the world of rock, Queen stands out as a good example of the clash between guitar and piano in songwriting. I think that’s where you stumble across those more unusual arrangements and chord structures. In my heart I want to do more hard rock music, but at the same time, I’m much more attracted to the piano. I think that automatically causes something unusual to happen. Also Smashing Pumpkins, even though they’re not piano-based. I always found their arrangements interesting, like on the album, Siamese Dream. In terms of guitar, I also like Rage Against the Machine and Jimi Hendrix.

But in terms of piano, I love Ben Folds, but to me, that’s a very different style of music. I love the low, heavy piano bit in “Jackson Cannery.” It made me realize if you want to get heavy, you have to get down there and hit some large chord.

How do you write?
Generally, it’s the music first. I’m always trying to find chord structures that haven’t been used before. That’s the first thing I look for; I try to find a chord structure that inspires the melody to just fall out of my mouth automatically. That usually inspires the lyrics. The words come very naturally to me. I think if you’re struggling to write words to a piece of music, it’s probably not inspiring you enough. In a song like “Apocalypse Please” on Absolution, the chord structure was so epic and in your face, and the words just fell out. The lyrics weren’t the kind of words I ever expected to sing. But in finding those kinds of weirder chords first, it inspired me to want to say something.

Do the words change between the writing and recording?
Sometimes, there’ll be one bit and you know it’s got to be those words, and you’re struggling to get the rest of the song to make sense around that. There will be two or three lines where that’s what it’s all about, and then you’ll struggle is to fill in the gaps and make the whole thing make sense. With most songs, I’ll get the melody complete and then get those two or three lines that are solid as a rock. That’s usually as finished as songs get in the purely natural sense. The rest of it is the challenge.

Do you find that sometimes when you write a line, the meaning may not come to you until months or years later?
Oh yeah, that does happen. Usually at the time of writing, I don’t always know what the lyrics are about. Then later on, it’s just so blatantly clear.

Do you ever write a lyric just for the rhyme only to figure out later that you actually said something profound?
Rhyme in some ways compromises the nature of pure poetry or words. I think what you achieve by rhyme is you link the lyrics and the music, which can have a more powerful effect than just words on their own.

Onstage, you have two Roland JP-8000s, how do you run them?
We run the JPs through amps because the sound through a DI was just too clean and it didn’t really fit with the band. Live, my JP runs through a Fender DeVille; it’s pretty clean sounding, but going through those little speakers makes it less full-range, which makes it easier to mix.

Did you use real Wurlitzer and Mellotron on your records?
Yeah. On the first album, that was real Mellotron. John Leckie was really into his old-school stuff and he pulled out the works, whereas Rich Costey who produced Absolution prefers more modern synths. So it was interesting working with those two different styles. I had mainly a piano upbringing, but I did have a Roland Juno 60. I used to muck around with that arpeggiator trying to find ways to make it lock. I’ve got a thing with arpeggios. [Laughs.]

Do you use any effects on the keyboards onstage?
I run both keyboards through the DeVille, so I can switch between a clean and a distorted sound. I run a DI from the MP9500 as well. I always keep the clean channel going and mix the distortion in to add some edge to it. I used to use a Wurlitzer onstage, but I found the MP9500 has such a good variety of sounds. I can pretty much find anything I need in there. I use a lot of the multi-patches, so I’ll have the piano backed up with strings or whatnot. I use the “Dirty Wurly” sound on a song called “Feeling Good,” which we put on our second album. It’s an Anthony Newley song, but it was made famous by Nina Simone. She’s one of my favorite singers.

Give us some insight into how you used keyboards on the record.
One of the sounds I liked the most — and which I think really made the song — was on “Sing For Absolution,” on Absolution. We got loads of guitar strings and laid them across the piano strings so every time I’d hold the sustain pedal down and play, we’d get this really nice rattle in the upper harmonics of the piano. We also ran the acoustic piano through a wah-wah pedal and an octave divider guitar pedal. That song was all about treating the piano. In fact, on “Sunburn” on the first album, we recorded the piano with a throat microphone from a military tank. We strapped them around the bottom of the piano to get a very milky, mysterious sound. I used an ARP that we got from Rick Rubin for a few things here or there as well.

On “Blackout,” did you use live strings?
Yes. We recorded an 18-piece orchestra. I arranged the main section and the arranger did the bit that was over the piano, which was a little more advanced. I just sat down with him and played how it was supposed to be, and he wrote it down. I notate things in [Apple] Logic sometimes.

What advice would you give to an up-and-coming keyboardist or piano player?
If you want to go into the world of rock, it’s best to teach yourself. If you want to go into the world of classical music, you have to practice eight hours a day and sort it out. I do regret not having lessons, because my technique is limited in certain ways, which at some point I’d like to address. I would like to have some lessons to try to improve my fingering technique and that kind of thing. I would like to be able to read the music of those composers I talked about, too.

But I’m glad I didn’t have lessons, because I think it makes for good songwriters. I think if you spend all your time learning other people’s music, you lose something in yourself. I think you either have the technique or the originality, and having both is something of genius and I think it’s very difficult to find. I think I traded one off for the other. Sometimes, I feel a limitation on my writing because of that. I feel like I’m compromising certain parts because I can’t take them to that next level. Also, I spread myself thinly across three instruments. But I think that’s because my interest has always been in writing music rather than with becoming an expert on an instrument.

-------------

keyboardmag
« última modificación: Dom, 21 de Ene del 2007, a las 22:25:59 por babydoll »

*

Desconectado *Akasha*

  • 1303
  • 7
  • Haz el bodywar y no la war xD
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #1 en: Dom, 21 de Ene del 2007, a las 22:53:25 »
bueno más menos por lo que me ha resumido babydoll he piyao el ilo del texto pero... seamos sinceros... que pone? xD


bueno merci de todas formas si lo traducis algun dia ya lo leeré mejor

graciasssssssssss

*

miriam_blanes

Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #2 en: Dom, 21 de Ene del 2007, a las 23:36:20 »
a mi ma parecido mu interesante la entrevista y mira k de piano no tengo ni idea.Pero es interesante enterarse k les parecio interesante tocar el piano, despues de acer la de suburn.

*

Desconectado evori

  • 840
  • 5
  • "apoliiiñaao" girl xD
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #3 en: Lun, 22 de Ene del 2007, a las 13:12:14 »
pues lo he leido asi por encima (me duele la cabeza, vengo de un examen  xD) y esta bastante bien, muy interesante el articulo  :)
I'm gonna sing until you hate this song...

*

Desconectado Yesable

  • 2608
  • 29
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #4 en: Lun, 22 de Ene del 2007, a las 14:12:32 »
muy interesante ^^ ^^ si que se le habia olvidado si tuvo que practicar 2 o 3 dias sunburn.. :eek

First the comedor, after the galaxy xD

*

Desconectado Geles

  • 2424
  • 208
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #5 en: Lun, 22 de Ene del 2007, a las 15:32:10 »
bueno más menos por lo que me ha resumido babydoll he piyao el ilo del texto pero... seamos sinceros... que pone? xD bueno merci de todas formas si lo traducis algun dia ya lo leeré mejor

graciasssssssssss

Estoy en ello  :) Aunque me está costando un huevazo, porque mis conocimientos técnicos musicales son nulos, así que cuando ponga la traducción, no os extrañéis si no he sabido cómo traducir algún término técnico  :unsure:

*

Desconectado *Akasha*

  • 1303
  • 7
  • Haz el bodywar y no la war xD
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #6 en: Lun, 22 de Ene del 2007, a las 23:44:42 »
aunque nos lo traducieras ocn le idioma de los indios ( Matt saber cosa buena xD) ya testaríamos agradecidos creo yo :lol:

*

Desconectado Geles

  • 2424
  • 208
Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #7 en: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 00:32:18 »
:juas

Mezclando un talento natural para la melodía y la armonía con un atractivo sentido del misterio y de la narración, Matt Bellamy se pone al frente del piano.

Las luces se apagan en el Marquee Theater de Phoenix y el público clama mientras el trío, en silueta, sale al escenario. El público canta extasiado cuando suenan los acordes que abren Apocalypse Please. Para la banda inglesa Muse, la adulación del público no es inesperada, sino enormemente apreciada. Su tercer álbum, Absolution, ha sido un exitazo, exponiéndolos a un público siempre creciente.

Muse es un trío poderoso de verdad. El tercio del escenario de Bellamy está ocupado por su guitarra y la plataforma del teclado, este último como una pirámide de metal al lado de la batería. A la vez que toca su Kawai MP9500, unas luces controladas por midi en la parte frontal de la plataforma crean un espectáculo visual que iguala su tórrida forma de tocar. Y está igualmente dotado como guitarrista. La pura energía que desata en ambos instrumentos, combinada con su catártica forma de cantar y sus letras, deja a los fans maravillados y sorprendidos de que tres personas puedan crear tal sonido gigantesco.

Sin embargo, no empezaron con esa visión de éxito. Bellamy describe los principios de la banda como los de unos típicos colegiales que forman bandas y tocan para evitar lo aburrido de la vida en un pueblo pequeño. Al principio, él sólo tocaba la guitarra en el grupo, una combinación de canciones originales y versiones. Empezaron en el grupo llamándose Rocket Baby Dolls, y Bellamy les describe como "con un aspecto parecido a The Cure, pero con un sonido como el de Rush. Llámalo gótico progresivo".

Era una banda principalmente instrumental, pero después de ganar el reñido concurso de Battle of the Bands y obtener una buena respuesta del jurado, empezaron a centrarse en componer. "Escribimos cientos de canciones", dice, "pero no empecé a expresarme más y a tener más confianza hasta los 18 ó 19. Acabé siendo el cantante por defecto. En el pueblo no había nadie que quisiera cantar. En aquellos tiempos no era muy cool cantar en falsete porque Nirvana estaban de moda. Pero vimos un concierto de Jeff Buckley, y a él no le daba miedo ser un hombre con una voz aguda. Creo que aquello me ayudó a abrirme y a no tener miedo de usar un estilo vocal más expresivo y emocional".

Algunos argumentarán que Bellamy ha perfeccionado su arte como compositor, cantante y músico, y su creciente legión de fans adoradores son el testimonio de sus melodías bien construidas y su gancho. Mientras Muse continúa de gira mundial ganando un reconocimiento más amplio, Bellamy y su banda disfrutan el momento y la adulación. Pero en el fondo, estos tres chicos del pequeño pueblo de Teignmouth están en ésto por puro amor a la música, y éso se nota.

El teclado volvió a los camerinos del Marquee, donde Bellamy nos contó la historia de Muse y nos habló del espíritu y  los métodos de trabajo de la banda mientras apartaba el telón.

Cómo es tu historia con el piano?

El piano fue el primer instrumento que toqué en realidad. No tomé clases, y aunque lo toqueteaba desde los cinco años, realmente no me interesé hasta los diez u once años. Mi padre ponía muchos discos de blues, Ray Charles y Stevie Wonder. Ray Charles fue el último que me llamó la atención. Solía practicar la mano izquierda al ritmo de What'd I Say, en plan boogie-woogie. Me pasé una eternidad intentando conseguirlo, practicando con la mano izquierda haciendo una cosa y tratando de hacer los acordes con la mano derecha.

Me apunté a un concurso de talentos y toqué un solo de esa pieza, y al final gané el concurso. Mi hermano mayor me llevó a la fuerza a este concurso de talentos y, aunque estaba muy nervioso, lo hice de todas formas. Hizo que quisiera salir ahí, tocar algunos conciertos y meterme en una banda. Cuando me metí en una banda por primera vez, con 13-14 años, no tocaba el piano desde hacía seis años más o menos, porque sólo había tocado la guitarra.

Volví a tocar el piano cuando nos pusimos a grabar nuestro primer álbum, Showbiz. Estábamos trabajando en una canción llamada Sunburn, que es una canción como de guitarra rasgada. Sonaba un poco floja, y como era una de mis favoritas, quería hacer que sonara bien. Entonces fue cuando John Leckie, nuestro productor, tuvo esta idea de probar la parte de guitarra con el piano. Parecía que era la primera vez que tocaba el piano en años, porque tuve que pasar dos o tres días practicando Sunburn, que es una parte bastante simple. Cuando la grabamos, sonaba un poco como a una banda sonora de Philip Glass.

Creo que en ese momento decidí volver a tocar el piano. Desde entonces fui en la dirección contraria, y empecé a trabajar intensivamente con el piano y la guitarra se convirtió en algo más bien para el directo. Diría que el 70-80% de las canciones que he escrito desde entonces, han sido compuestas con piano. Aunque en directo toco algunas con guitarra. Incluso una canción como Stockholm Syndrome fue compuesta con piano. Me resulta fácil encontrar acordes interesantes en el piano. Especialmente porque en muchas cosas de las que hacemos, la guitarra y el bajo van en armonía; no sólo toco power chords (*) y Chris (Wolstenholme, bajista) no sólo toca notas de base (root notes).

Qué tipo de música escuchabas para inspirarte?

Empecé investigando música clásica y gente como Philip Glass. Escuchando éso, me dí cuenta de que realmente no me gustaba la música propiamente clásica de alrededor de 1750, como Mozart y todo éso. Pero con Philip Glass... su música tiene mucho misterio. Ésa fue mi introducción al descubrimiento de esa faceta musical, esa especie de naturaleza abstracta de la música que no tiene letras ni título. Con Rachmaninoff, Lizst y Chopin hay un misterio en la música, y es mucho más abstracto, y te estimula mucho más la imaginación, creo. Para mí aquello fue algo que nunca había descubierto en la música. Por aquel entonces tenía 19 ó 20 años.

Así que, más que aprenderte piezas, extraías el sabor, la esencia.

Sí. Sabía que era demasiado tarde para alcanzar ese nivel de técnica para tocar ese tipo de piezas. Pero quería intentar incorporar esa clase de misterio a la banda. Es algo que ha tenido tanto impacto emocional a lo largo de la historia, que ha conseguido pervivir durante casi doscientos años. Creo que algo de éso empezó a colarse en el segundo álbum, Origin of Symmetry, y luego también en el nuevo disco.

En realidad no estoy seguro de lo lejos que podemos llegar con éso. Hay un par de canciones en las que estoy trabajando ahora que van en esa línea. Una canción que de verdad muestra éso está en el segundo disco; se llama Space Dementia. Siempre quise hacer una canción heavy que pudiera tener sólo piano, sin guitarra. Creo que conseguimos éso también en Butterflies and Hurricanes en el nuevo álbum. Intentaba encontrar un tipo de piano clásico que fuera contundente, y que funcionara bien con el bajo y la batería. Tenía esta especie de paradiddle mecánico (**) que luego se rompe en esa parte romántica y fluida del medio.

Cuando compusiste Butterflies and Hurricanes intentabas romper el ritmo conscientemente o sucedió de forma natural?

Hacerlo mecánico formaba parte de todo el concepto. La compuse al piano y al principio no sabía cómo íbamos a meter el bajo y la batería para que quedara bien. Steve Reich hizo ese tipo de piano repetitivo e intenso en su pieza In C. Quería conseguir éso y que luego entrara algo emotivo de verdad. En realidad va de éso, del contraste entre las dos partes. El desafío era integrarlo con el bajo y la percusión.

Muchas de tus composiciones no se atienen a la estructura normal de una canción. Qué te inspira a componer fuera de la norma?

En el mundo del rock, Queen sobresalen como un buen ejemplo del enfrentamiento entre guitarra y piano en la composición de canciones. Creo que ahí es donde te encuentras con esos arreglos y esas estructuras de acordes más inusuales. De corazón, quiero hacer más rock duro, pero al mismo tiempo me atrae mucho más el piano. Creo que hace que ocurra algo inusual. También Smashing Pumpkins, aunque no se basen en el piano. Sus arreglos siempre me parecieron interesantes, como en el disco Siamese Dream. En términos de guitarra también me gustan Rage Against The Machine y Jimi Hendrix.

Pero en cuanto al piano, me encanta Ben Folds, aunque para mí es un estilo de música muy distinto. Me encanta la parte de piano de Jackson Cannery. Hizo que me diera cuenta de que, si quieres ponerte heavy, tienes que bajar a ese nivel y tocar un gran acorde.

Cómo compones?

Por lo general, lo primero es la música. Siempre trato de encontrar estructuras de acordes que no se hayan usado antes. Es lo primero que busco; intento encontrar una estructura de acordes que me inspire la melodía para que salga de mi boca automáticamente. Éso normalmente me inspira la letra. Las letras me vienen de una manera muy natural. Creo que si te esfuerzas en escribir la letra de una pieza musical, es que probablemente no te está inspirando lo suficiente. En una canción como Apocalypse Please, en Absolution, la estructura de acordes era tan épica y saltaba tanto a la vista que la letra simplemente vino a mí. La letra no era el tipo de letra que esperaba cantar. Pero el hecho de encontrar primero ese tipo más raro de acordes, me inspiró a querer decir algo.

La letra cambia entre la composición y la grabación?

A veces habrá una parte que sabes que tiene que llevar esa letra, y te esfuerzas en que el resto de la canción sea coherente con éso. Habrá dos o tres líneas en las que éso será todo, y entonces tratas de completar las lagunas y hacer que el conjunto tenga sentido. Con la mayoría de las canciones completo la melodía y luego encajo esas dos o tres líneas sólidas. Normalmente las canciones llegan en un sentido puramente natural. El resto es el desafío.

Te encuentras con que a veces, cuando escribes una línea, el significado no te llega hasta meses o años después?

Oh sí, éso pasa. Normalmente, a la hora de escribir, no siempre sé de qué va la letra. Y luego más tarde lo veo claro a todas luces.

Alguna vez escribes una letra simplemente por la rima para luego darte cuenta de que en realidad dijiste algo profundo?

La rima de alguna manera compromete la naturaleza de la pura poesía o de las letras. Creo que lo que consigues con la rima es enlazar la letra y la música, lo cual puede tener un efecto más contundente que la letra sola.

En el escenario tienes dos Roland JP-8000, cómo los controlas?

Controlamos los JPs a través de amplificadores porque el sonido que salía con el DI era demasiado limpio y realmente no encajaba con la banda. En directo, mi JP pasa por un Fender DeVille; suena bastante limpio, pero al pasarlo por esos pequeños altavoces se hace menos amplio, lo cual es más fácil de mezclar.

Usasteis auténticos Wurlitzer y Mellotron en vuestros discos?

Sí. En el primer álbum, aquéllo era un auténtico Mellotron. A John Leckie le encantaban estas cosas de la vieja escuela, mientras que Rich Costey, que produjo Absolution, prefiere sintetizadores más modernos. Así que fue interesante trabajar con esos dos estilos diferentes. Yo tenía formación en piano principalmente, pero tenía un Roland Juno 60. Solía hacer el tonto con ese "arpegiador" e intentaba encontrar maneras de bloquearlo. Tengo debilidad por los arpegios (se ríe).

Usas efectos en el teclado en directo?

Controlo ambos teclados con el DeVille, así que puedo cambiar de un sonido limpio a otro distorsionado. Controlo un DI desde el MP9500 también. Siempre dejo funcionando el canal limpio y lo mezclo con la distorsión para hacerlo más "cortante". Solía usar un Wurlitzer en directo, pero descubrí que el MP9500 tenía una variedad de sonidos tan buena... Ahí puedo encontrar casi cualquier cosa que necesite. Tengo el piano apoyado con cuerdas o cualquier otra cosa. Utilizo el sonido "dirty wurly" en una canción llamada Feeling Good, del segundo disco. Es una canción de Anthony Newley, pero la hizo famosa Nina Simone. Es una de mis cantantes favoritas.

Danos una visión de cómo usaste los teclados en el disco.

Uno de los sonidos que más me gustaron -y que realmente creo que originó la canción- estaba en Sing for Absolution, en Absolution. Cogimos montones de cuerdas de guitarra y las pusimos encima de las cuerdas del piano, así que cada vez que pisaba el pedal y tocaba, conseguíamos este sonido como de sonajero en los armónicos altos del piano. También controlamos el piano a través de un pedal wah-wah y un pedal de guitarra que divide las octavas. Esa canción iba de experimentar con el piano. De hecho, en Sunburn, en el primer disco, grabamos el piano con un micrófono de garganta de un tanque militar. Lo atamos en la parte de atrás del piano para conseguir un sonido lechoso (???) y misterioso. Usé también un ARP que conseguimos de Rick Rubin para algunas cosas aquí y allá.

En Blackout usasteis cuerdas en directo?

Sí. Grabamos a una orquesta de 18 músicos. Arreglé la sección principal y el arreglista hizo la parte que estaba por encima del piano, que era un poco más "avanzada", difícil. Me senté con él y toqué como se suponía que era, y él la escribió. A veces anoto cosas en [Apple] Logic.

Qué consejo darías a un teclista o pianista prometedor?

Si quieres meterte en el mundo del rock, es mejor ser autodidacta. Si quieres meterte en el mundo de la música clásica, tienes que practicar ocho horas al día y perfeccionar. Lamento de verdad no haber tomado clases, porque mi técnica es en cierto modo limitada. Me gustaría tomar algunas clases para intentar mejorar mi técnica y esas cosas. También me gustaría saber leer la música de aquellos compositores de los que hablabla. Pero me alegro de no haber tomado clases, porque creo que contribuye a ser buen compositor. Creo que si te pasas todo el tiempo aprendiendo la música de otra gente, pierdes algo de ti mismo. Creo que, o tienes la técnica, o la originalidad, y tener ambas es cosa de genios, y creo que éso es muy difícil de encontrar. Siento que comprometo ciertas partes porque no puedo llevarlas a ese siguiente nivel. Además, tengo que repartirme  entre tres instrumentos. Pero creo que es porque mi interés siempre ha estado en componer música más que en ser un experto de un instrumento.

(*) power chord o quinta (digo "quinta" porque si se dice "octava" también se dirá "quinta", no? xD) es un tipo de acorde de guitarra que suele tocarse con distorsión; es típico en rock, metal y punk. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_chord

(**) en percusión, paradiddle es un patrón de cuatro notas que consiste en dos notas alternas seguidas de dos notas con la misma mano. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradiddle
« última modificación: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 10:48:27 por frikimuza »

*

miriam_blanes

Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #8 en: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 01:09:09 »

Danos una visión de cómo usaste los teclados en el disco.

 De hecho, en Sunburn, en el primer disco, grabamos el piano con un micrófono de garganta de un tanque militar. Lo atamos en la parte de atrás del piano para conseguir un sonido lechoso (???) y misterioso. Usé también un ARP que conseguimos de Rick Rubin para algunas cosas aquí y allá.


Sonido lechoso o con mucha leche y misterioso  xD , la cosa es k el sonido tiene leche, mucha o poca pero la tiene  xD xD xD xD

P.D: aun estas viva? despues de traducir la entrevista
« última modificación: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 01:11:50 por miriam_blanes »

*

Desconectado Geles

  • 2424
  • 208
Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #9 en: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 10:54:51 »
Sonido lechoso o con mucha leche y misterioso  xD , la cosa es k el sonido tiene leche, mucha o poca pero la tiene  xD xD xD xD

Juaaasss, ni idea de a qué se refiere con "milky sound" xD, porque, por más acepciones que he buscado, no he encontrado nada distinto a "referido a la leche" jjjjjjjj. A lo mejor se refiere al color, "sonido blanco"  :huh: Aisss, qué bonita sinestesia ^^ ... Matt es poeta xD

Tampoco sé qué son los multi-patches. Hmm... más cosas... he traducido high armonics literalmente, "armónicos altos", no sé si será correcto. Supongo que habrá una palabra para chord structure, estructura de acordes, que desconozco, claro. Y para fingering technique imagino que también habrá una palabra específica. Vamos, que le gustaría mover mejor los dedos xD.

Algún músico en la sala que nos ilumine?

Citar
P.D: aun estas viva? despues de traducir la entrevista

Vivita, sí. Y trabajando en la siguiente  :)
« última modificación: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 11:14:55 por frikimuza »

*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #10 en: Mar, 23 de Ene del 2007, a las 17:45:25 »
Joe Geles, eres una auténtica máquina de la traducción ^^

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #11 en: ſáb, 17 de Feb del 2007, a las 18:21:28 »
Cita de: Matt Bellamy
Normalmente, a la hora de escribir, no siempre sé de qué va la letra.

xDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD así que no era cosa mía xD

Citar
Uno de los sonidos que más me gustaron -y que realmente creo que originó la canción- estaba en Sing for Absolution, en Absolution. Cogimos montones de cuerdas de guitarra y las pusimos encima de las cuerdas del piano, así que cada vez que pisaba el pedal y tocaba, conseguíamos este sonido como de sonajero en los armónicos altos del piano.
buenísimo!!! siempre me encantó ese efecto  :cheesy:

Citar
Lamento de verdad no haber tomado clases, porque mi técnica es en cierto modo limitada. Me gustaría tomar algunas clases para intentar mejorar mi técnica y esas cosas.

pero cómo se atreve a decir eso :eek con la guitarra no, pero al piano si que me parece un virtuoso  :blush:
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado Geles

  • 2424
  • 208
Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #12 en: ſáb, 17 de Feb del 2007, a las 18:50:38 »
pero cómo se atreve a decir eso :eek con la guitarra no, pero al piano si que me parece un virtuoso  :blush:

Yo de estas cosas ni warra, pero de todas formas me parece un poco difícil ver claramente si es un virtuoso o no en las canciones tal y como las conocemos, porque el piano está adaptado al ritmo de la canción, es un instrumento más, no el único; lo veríamos mejor en un solo, imagino... Y a la guitarra me parece que se está superando a pasos agigantados; ayer me puse Knights en Madrid y me quedé OMG... no lo recordaba tan... perfecto!  :cheesy:

Pero bueno, nadie mejor que él para conocer sus "limitaciones", oye... si él lo dice...

*

Desconectado deborah X

  • 7095
  • 246
Re: Innocence and Absolution: transleision...
« Respuesta #13 en: ſáb, 17 de Feb del 2007, a las 18:54:05 »
lo veríamos mejor en un solo

y qué es lo que hace en butterflies & hurricanes?  :cool: no sé, yo es por la forma de tocar que tiene... sí con 11 años el tío ya daba miedo  :eek

todavía tengo sueños guarros cuando recuerdo lo que aparecía en las pantallas en la gira de Absolution; sí, cuando enchufaban al teclado  :cheesy:
IAMTerrified

*

Desconectado Skttrbrain

  • 1567
  • 50
Re: Innocence and Absolution
« Respuesta #14 en: ſáb, 17 de Feb del 2007, a las 20:18:51 »
Tenia entendido que si que habia tomado clases de piano...dichosos rumores...

 

TinyPortal © 2005-2012