semidetached semidetached
*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 09:52:27 »
Aquí tenéis una entrevista de la edición de junio de la revista francesa Rock & Folk. La traducción es del francés al inglés, así que si tenemos algún francés por aquí que quiera traducirlo al español... :whistle :laugh:







Scans/fuente: Random Musigs for a Curious Mind
Traducción francés-inglés: Valerie



If there are bands we like to hate, there are some we hate to like. Muse are among the latest.

It’s much like this mysterious English Marmite, black and acrid, repulsive or addictive: love it or hate it.

However, pros & cons can only admit that their fast rise to “best live band in the world” is a quite fascinating phenomenon.

In only 10 years these 3 kids who were rehearsing in their garage are now selling out 2 Stade de France & sold 80 000 tickets for Wembley in less than 12 minutes!

Can you go any higher? You would have to rent a planet!

A new flame

They’ve been tagged with many music styles, but it’s quite hard to classify Muse. Songs are complex, experimental, lyrics are paranoid, exulting and romantic; Bellamy’s 3 octaves voice lyrical and their live stage performances make you breathless. Whether you like it or hate it Muse is pharaonic.

Obsessed with pyramids, sci-fi , opera, political chaos and the idea of resistance, the thirty something from Devon has built an empire, a cathedral, a worldwide fervor.

When their second (and one of their best) album OOS come out critics (like NME) are baffled by their maturity and a certain modernity they bring to a strong musical heritage (Children of Kobain, Kafka, Mahler….). Muse is a war machine. Their albums are temples, their concerts public masses, their music energetic and electro-magnetic, like no other. When brit-pop reigns the 3 lads bring a new flame to music.

If Muse was a film it would be a mix of 2001, Kubrick & Stargate, a mutant creature, metaphysics with high tech effects. Muse is Queen meets with Rachmaninov sent at light speed through a particles accelerator.

It’s during their Resistance tour that we meet with these 3 young, intelligent, nice guys ready to set stadiums alight.

As in any legend there is a beginning. The fantastic destiny of Matthew Bellamy, Dominic Howard and Christopher Wolstenholme starts in Teignmouth ,Devon, in the UK. These childhood friend, bored in their little town, are more interested by Nirvana & Smashing Pumpkins than by Brit-Pop. Like many other kids they start their bands, somehow dreaming about success. Bellamy is a young musical prodigy with divorced parents who starts playing piano & guitar to get his father’s attention (him having been in The Tornados, a band with a N°1 hit in America in the 60s).  The kid listens to blues, Jazz and most importantly classical music, which will always be a huge influence in Muse’s compositions. Charismatic and restless, he has often talked about his passion for Chopin, Berlioz and Tchaikovski. While a teenager, he becomes friend with Dom Howard Chris Wolstenholme and together they skim schools “rock battles” under various names, delivering intense and violent live performances.

Bellamy, a frail man with piercing blue eyes remembers:  “we were hardly 18, with outrageous make-up & clothes, causing havoc on stage, but we won and from that point we decided to take our music a bit more seriously”.  In 1998 they sign their first EP with Taste Media. Their first album Showbiz  (1999) will be the beginning of a supersonic rise. The Muse brand is already on it, intense, powerful, lyrical, full of saturated guitars, oppressing electronics, melodramatic rhythms and with an epic sense of paranoia.

Showbiz gives the A, but it’s OOS (released in 2001), album saturated with Mellotrons and organs, that will give the band a large radio exposure. Darker and more complex, this album has these strong classical influences, tainted with opera-rock and sounds experimentations like on Space Dementia, still Ballamy’s favorite. A rock hybrid is born, a glam monster with cringing complaints, a raging cry in a world saturated with information and lies.

2 years later, seeing the band perform in Paris Bercy Arena is a hard slap in the face. A deafening show that gets you off the ground, a religious fervor that only Depeche Mode had achieved before that.  Sweet and acrid, the songs distil monumental sharp riffs and sweet melancholic piano parts.

Since then Muse has received numerous “best band” and “best live band” awards. These 3 young men are incredible performers with an uncommon powerful sound. It’s already a super mass, with outrageous video projections and an abundance of lights and special effects.

The watchword: Resistance

A few years later they sell out Wembley, twice 80 000 tickets.

Could they ever have imagined that? Dominic remembers: “we always had such dreams when we were kids, 16/17, we wanted big things. I went for the first time to the Reading Festival in 1994 and I was picturing us on the main stage. These were dreams and aspirations. I was watching RATM thinking “it’s really a killer, we have to get on that stage someday” and we did it. But we went further then what we expected, which is a bit contradictory as we were dreaming about it but in the meantime we really surprised ourselves.”

It’s in France that the alchemy first works, strongly bonding the band with the country.

Albums keep coming up every two years, Absolution in 2003 bringing them to the main stream of the force.  Paradoxically, the more complex and epic the songs, the more mystical the lyrics, the bigger is the success. However, it’s from this point on that their more hardcore followers shy away as it’s not in good taste anymore to be a fan of this band with paranoid organs. Muse is also an attitude, reminded over and over by Bellamy’s high octaves, tormented and stripped to the chore personae, with one watchword: Resistance.

The songs evoke universal emotions: hanger, frustration, the whish for absolute. The young band does not make any concessions. They leave Maverick, their US record company, who wants to turn their lyrics into something more “radio friendly”. They succeed into keeping both their rough side and a more popular one.

These children have built an empire on the Brit-Pop bones, with specific musical colors, far far away from Radiohead to whom they’ve been endlessly compared for years. Absolution is also the album that brought them from middle size venues to large arenas and stadiums. According to the band and numerous critics, it’s in 2004, at Glastonbury Festival in front of 60 000 people, that they give their more striking performance. Unfortunately, it’s also that day that Dominic Howard’s father, who attended the gig, dies from a heart attack. Matt Bellamy evokes that drama in these terms: “this concert was our lifetime musical accomplishment. Dom’s father death was surreal. We helped Dom as best as we could and he was happy in a sense to know that his father was there to see his son’s accomplishment that night”.

Was Matt Bellamy thinking about his own father, whom he admired and picked up a guitar for, at that time? Who said that children would build an empire on their father’s bones and become pharaohs?

BH&R is released in 2006. This album introduces new influences, from Queen to Philip Glass via Prince’s electro-funk. It’s quickly followed by HAARP, their first live one, recorded during their 2 Wembley concerts in 2007. Awards fall like rain. The overwhelming size of their concerts infuses new amplitudes to their following and latest album The Resistance which ends with a 3 part symphony “Exogenesis”, very much born from Bellamy’s classical influences.

The secret of their alchemy will always stay a mystery, but something’s growing by the hour.

The threesome will soon take over the Stade de France, Wembley, Glastonbury, with Steve Wonder, along with every arena on the planet. So, are you ready?

Interview:

Muse Ministry


R&F: Your tours are like marathons. How do you prepare yourself for this?

CW: Much more seriously now. When you’re young you don’t care about partying all the time, but not anymore. I’ve done some good work out before it all. Concerts are being quite physical so it helps keeping in good shape. For 10 years I’ve being drunk most of the time while on tour, but now I’ve stopped drinking and I feel much better then when I was 25. You have to be careful as your mind stay young but your body does not and you realize that you’re not as strong as you used to be.

MB: We go do some work out cessions a few weeks before the tour starts, but I’m rather lazy and not really into sports. The first week is usually very tiresome then you get used to the routine. In fact, you suck up the crowd’s energy. You transform all this tension and expectations into energy, you feed from it. I need this to be in great form.

R&F: And you Dominic, when we see your slight frame we hardly understand how you can come up with such a powerful drum play. What’s your secret?

DH: (with deep voice) The force comes from within (laughter). No, it’s nothing to do with physical strength, when you play in front of 60 000 people it’s adrenaline that gives you that. After a gig you find yourself electric and drenched but mentally high.

R&F: This gigantic size of the tours, isn’t it too much?

CW: It’s huge yes, but we love that. However we know there are limits, you can’t reasonably go over 100 000 people or it’s not a concert anymore. We love doing stadiums like Wembley or the Parc des Princes (Paris), it’s very impressive. Playing in a stadium is not something you can foresee, even if you have a huge ego or ambition. When we started out we were going to see bands playing in front of 2 000 people and were thinking it was big already. But rapidly we went from this size to big arenas and then stadiums and we hardly saw it coming. For the 2 Stade de France we were really nervous. First we were only thinking about doing one, and not sure about it. The Parc des Princes was already 25 000 people but with this one it was 80 000 people to bring in. But it sold out quickly so we tried a second one and it also sold out in a few hours.

MB: With such big concerts the pressure is quite important. When you’re in great shape and very confident it’s fine, there is nothing better than feeling that you can get to the top, give everything to your public, and it happens most of the time.  However, when you’re tired everything can go the wrong way, become a nightmare and then you feel unworthy. It’s a risky job. These tours have had a very negative impact on our personal lives. We are to the point where we must find some kind of equilibrium in our lives. It’s when your personal life gets out of control that you get very tired of all this. When you’re on the other side of the world and got problems with your girlfriend, ex girlfriend for me, but you’re not there to solve them it becomes very problematic as you cannot do anything to solve them. The down side of these gigantic tours is the sacrifice of a personal life.

R&F: During this tour, that emphasizes a very complex album, will you bring an orchestra onstage for the symphony? Could you give us some hints about the show?

MB: We thought about the orchestra, but the logistics to bring so many players onstage are too complicated. There are some limits and our show are already so big… I think I could not deal with the amount of stress brought by this (laughter). So I don’t know if we’ll ever play the whole Exogenesis symphony live. We’re going to start rehearsing it and see if we can synthesize the strings …

R&F: What do you say to people who accuse you of megalomania with these pharaonic shows?

CW: We don’t care about megalomania.  It’s BH&R that brought us where we are now, to stadium level. It’s been a new chapter in our history. The live show also influences the studio recordings. The Parc des Prince & Wembley have influenced some songs like Guiding Light. There is this “stadium” feeling to them.

MB: Yes I think we would be happy to come back to something simpler. But we’re doing it to test our limits, to see how far and wide we can go. It’s experimentation. But we would be happy to go back to smaller venues.

R&F: What’s the difference between a stadium and a small venue in terms of feelings?

MB: Intimacy. In small venues you can see people, see faces, you can sing a song for a specific person, and there is a connection. It’s less dramatic, less epic & simple.  You cannot play the exact same songs in a stadium and in a small arena. A song like Take a Bow would not work in a small venue, it’s made for stadiums.

CW: Yes it’s very different. In a stadium you feel overwhelmed, it’s a very strong emotion, and you feel proud. When we did Wembley I was breathless, emotionally drowned when I went up on stage. All our families were there in the Royal box. At that moment everything came back to me: our beginnings, the first time we signed a record contract and I thought it wasn’t that far ago.

A small gig is pure and rough energy; there is electricity in the air going around the public and on stage. You see their reaction, there is a link as in a stadium it’s a collective trance.

R&F: While talking about trance, how do you explain both the fervor and the rejection Muse provokes?

MB: It’s hard to tell but the extremes reactions are created when something unexpected or very peculiar happens. Maybe my voice has frequencies that some people cannot stand (laughter). It all depends on ears size (more laughter).

CW: Music is extreme hence extreme reactions. I prefer seeing these reactions then being in a band that sell millions of albums because they are seen as politically correct. I’d rather have my music loved by a few then found “all right” by millions. We don’t do music that stays on shelves without being listened to. Our fans are hardcore, they have all the albums, singles, bootlegs, buy t-shirts and go to many gigs during the tour. Sometimes I go onto the forums and they keep talking about us, night and day.

R&F: Your success mainly comes from fans who relate to the songs. What do they tell them?

MB: I think we’ve talked about the world as it’s been for the last 10 years. The way it’s been presented in through education and the media, the way people really feel about it. There is a difference, a division. I think our songs emphasize this. Our public feels this confusion and wants a change.

R&F: Have you always felt this confusion?

MB: Yes, I think so. When I was in school I wasn’t feeling in synch with what was thought, I was always questioning things. I’ve always relying on my own feelings about the world. It’s the same nowadays, I’ve got this instinct that kicks in and makes me want to rise against an established order. There is something wrong in this world and you have to resist. I’ve never trusted the information that’s been forced on us. I kind of rebel against a dominant thought. I rely on deep emotions. But maybe it’s just a mental disorder (laughter).

R&F: Is your fans fervor still a surprise?

MB: Oh yes! I’m always surprised when I meet fans who have tattooed Muse name or our names. Every time I think to myself that we’ll never be able to split the band.  It brings a kind of responsibility. There is a strong link with our fans and that’s why we’ll never split up after a fight, a bad mood or because one of us would become a junky, because the link is too strong and we have to keep it up. This responsibility is something that keeps us sane, that protects us as well.

R&F: What do you say when people tell you that Muse is a prog band? Does it bother you?

MB: Yes I hear that more and more. But it’s just a part of what we are. We have a prog side in some songs complexity, but we also have a pop feeling like in Starlight or Time is running Out. Some songs got their inspiration from progressive rock, but if you look at the singles it’s not the case.

DH: (pulling a face) For me prog rock is very much linked to the 70s, Pink Floyd, Genensis. I do not like this rock-fusion and I don’t think we’re coming from this. This term “progressive” is not a pejorative one. We do complex arrangements; we like to let our songs get lost in many meanders. But it’s just a terminology applying to songs that are outside of the usual squared 3 minutes ones.

France, the first country

R&F: What are your best memories from the tours?

DH: We have many, but mostly forgotten ones (laughter). I don’t remember a lot from the BH&R tour. Wembley is unforgettable, the biggest concert outside a festival with 75 000 people. When we played Blackout two acrobats hooked under giant balloons flew over the crowd and it was beautiful.  From behind the drumkit I was watching both the show and the public and it was like being on the other side for once.

MB: 2007 was fantastic, along with the Australian tour. It’s very difficult to pick one in particular. Wembley and Glastonbury were incredible moments of course. But also Saint-Malo and la Route du Rock 10 years ago, in front of 10 000 people. Back then it was our biggest gig, a real shock! I will never forget Saint-Malo.

R&F: It’s in France that your career really took off. Why this very peculiar link with a non English speaking country?

CW: I don’t know, it came as a surprise. Yes, in France it started very early. We were not known, but in 2003 we did a small gig for radio Oui FM and 500 people turned up. It was the first time we were asked for autographs, photos, the first time we felt like rock stars. It was the first country where this was happening. And the Route du Rock dumbfounded us.

For us France was the first to join the bandwagon, other countries were slower.

R&F: Are you already thinking about a new album? Something more classical?

MB: Classical music? Maybe but I don’t know if it’s going to be with Muse. Maybe more like a side project. I have written songs but I do not think it’s good to make a new Muse album that soon, we need a break. And now there is the new tour coming up, so more bonfires to be burnt!
« última modificación: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 11:30:22 por Beibi »

*

Desconectado PtitRouf

  • Closer to God
  • 5009
  • 187
  • Frenchie musera [Trent addict]
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #1 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 10:53:31 »
Me pongo yo.  :)

*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #2 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 11:09:08 »
Gracias ^^

*

Desconectado CryingShame

  • 4877
  • 114
  • Que tramáis morenos???
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #3 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 11:25:51 »
Gracias a las dos, por subirla y traducirla.
Pero por lo pronto lo de siempre: que fotos love xD (me gusta mucho la de Mateo en oscuro con su aureola de colorines ^^)
26/06/12 (23:35:28) Danielo: crying, te cambio 4 gatos y dos cabras por todo tu hamor DD:

*

Desconectado mousse

  • 873
  • 14
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #4 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 11:34:26 »
Gracias por otra megaentrevista  xD...muy interesante, como siempre (lo que he podido entender, vamos  :whistle) esperaré pacientemente a la traducción, gracias  ^^

De lo que he entendido me ha gustado sobre todo cuando dicen que se alimentan de la energía del público, que transforman toda esa tensión y expectación en energía...la adrenalina les da lo que necesitan...("la fuerza viene del interior"  :lol:)

"Our fans are hardcore, they have all the albums, singles, bootlegs, buy t-shirts and go to many gigs during the tour. Sometimes I go onto the forums and they keep talking about us, night and day."....cómo nos conocen  :jijiji:

R&F: Is your fans fervor still a surprise?

MB: Oh yes! I’m always surprised when I meet fans who have tattooed Muse name or our names. Every time I think to myself that we’ll never be able to split the band.  It brings a kind of responsibility. There is a strong link with our fans and that’s why we’ll never split up after a fight, a bad mood or because one of us would become a junky, because the link is too strong and we have to keep it up. This responsibility is something that keeps us sane, that protects us as well.

:hug:

*

Desconectado *Anais h*

  • 1292
  • 8
  • Shut up and do it!!
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #5 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 12:49:38 »
Gracias a las dos, por subirla y traducirla.
Pero por lo pronto lo de siempre: que fotos love xD (me gusta mucho la de Mateo en oscuro con su aureola de colorines ^^)
Pues sí, es muy chula, sobre todo por la escala de colores que se forma, pero soy yo, o tiene las rodillas metidas para dentro?  :jijiji:

Gracias por el aporte, y por la traducción chicas  ^^

*

Desconectado Lestrange

  • Miss Charm 2012
  • 3911
  • 70
  • I... am... teléfono... mi caaaaaasa
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #6 en: Mar, 22 de Jun del 2010, a las 14:57:04 »
¡¡Gracias por la entrevista y la traducción!!

Esperando esta última, que estoy vaga para leerla en inglés ( :ashamed: ), corroboro lo de la foto de Mateo, es superchula. Y sí Anais:

Pues sí, es muy chula, sobre todo por la escala de colores que se forma, pero soy yo, o tiene las rodillas metidas para dentro?  :jijiji:

tiene las rodillas dobladas para dentro  :tongue4:

Batmoon

*

Desconectado PtitRouf

  • Closer to God
  • 5009
  • 187
  • Frenchie musera [Trent addict]
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #7 en: Mar, 29 de Jun del 2010, a las 18:16:35 »
Aquí está la traducción. Perdonen las faltas, que sólo he podido revisar por encima.  :cool:
__________________________________________________________________________

Si existe algún grupo que a la gente le gusta odiar, también existe uno que algunos odian amar. Muse forma parte de ésos. Su eslogan podría ser el del Marmite, este misterioso condimento inglés, negro y ácido, repugnante y adictivo : Love it or hate it. Pero, partidistas o detractores, sólo podemos reconocer que el fulgurante éxito del trío considerado actualmente como uno de los grupos de directo más importantes del mundo es un fenómeno fascinante. Hace diez años, los tres chicos acababan de salir del garaje en el que ensayaban, hoy en día, se han agotado las entradas para sus dos conciertos en el Stade de France en junio en menos de una hora, y se dice que las 80 000 entradas para Wembley se habrían agotado en doce minutos. ¿Se puede crecer más? Habría que alquilar un planeta.

Nueva llama

Space prog-rock, fusión sci-fi cruzado con hard, electro, música clásica, con una punta de funk y R&B, es difícil definir la marca de Muse. Las canciones son complejas, amplias, a veces experimentales, las letras paranoicas, exaltadas, romanescas, la voz de Bellamy – que se desprende sobre varios octavas – lírica, cautivadora. El repertorio es grande, potente, proferatorio y las prestaciones en directo dejan sin respiración. Que guste o que disguste, Muse es un grupo faraónico. Obsesionado por la figura de la pirámide, la ciencia-ficción, la ópera, el caos político y la idea de resistencia, el joven trío trenteañero del Devon ha construido un imperio, una catedral, provocando un fervor mundial titanesco.

Cuando salió su segundo disco, uno de sus mejores, “Origin of Symmetry”, en 2001, un crítico del NME dijo : “Es arrebatador, esta manera que tiene un grupo tan joven de modernizar la herencia tanto de Cobain como de Kafka, Gustav Mahler y los Tiger Lilies, Cronenberg y Schönberg, consiguiendo realizar con esto un disco popular y sexy”. Muse es una máquina de guerra, sus discos son templos, sus conciertos misas gigantes, su música una fuente electromagnética sin igual. Nacieron plebeyos en una época en la que reinaba la britpop, y esos tres chicos que estaban en segundo plano llevan ahora una nueva llama. Muchos no ven de muy buen ojo esta desmesura, este lirismo, este look, la estampería fluo-gótica, la fealdad incontestada de las carátulas.

¿Pero la música siempre tiene que ser algo de buen gusto? Si Muse fuera una película, sería una mezcla del soplo formal de “2001...”, de Kubrick y del delirio cosmo-egipcio del “Stargate” de Roland Emerich, una criatura mutante, una metafísica con efectos high tech. Muse, es Queen meets Rachmaninov, todo eso propulsado a la velocidad de la luz en un accelerador de partículas. Durante la gira The Resistance Tour, vemos a tres jóvenes, inteligentes, normales y simpáticos, que se preparan para abrasar los estadios más grandes del mundo.

Pero como todas las leyendas, siempre tiene que haber un principio. El destino fabuloso de Matthew Bellamy (canto, teclados, guitarras, líder), Chris Wolstenholme (bajo) y Dominic Howard (batería) empieza en la insignificante ciudad de Teignmouth, en el Devon, en Reino Unido, Los tres amigos de infancia, aburridos de la vida provincial, más fans de Nirvana y Smashing Pumpkins que de la britpop en pleno desarrollo, crean un grupo que, como miles de adolescentes antes que ellos, empieza a soñar con el éxito. Bellamy, prodigio músico precoz es hijo de padres separados y autodidacta inspirado. Empieza a tocar la guitarra y el piano para llamar la atención de su padre, ex guitarrista de un grupo de jazz, The Tornados, que fue el primer grupo británico en entrar en los charts americanos en los años 60. Progresa tan rápido que su hermano mayor le pide que le transcriba canciones de los Smiths al piano. El niño escucha blues, jazz, y un poco más adelante, música clásica, influencias que se encuentran frecuentemente en la composición compleja de las canciones de Muse. Carismático y atormentado, habla mucho de su pasión por Chopin, Berlioz, Tchaïkovski. Durante su adolescencia, se une a Dominic y Chris y empiezan juntos los rock battles donde se afrontan pequeños grupos regionales. Ganan un concurso bajo el nombre de Rocket Baby Dolls, con prestaciones intensas y violentas. Bellamy, un joven endeble con ojos azules penetrantes, se acuerda : “Sólo teníamos dieciocho años. Nos subíamos al escenario maquillados, muy mal vestidos, hacíamos conciertos muy intensos, lo rompíamos todo. Para nosotros, era una forma de provocación, y cuando ganamos fue una gran sorpresa. A partir de entonces empezamos a tomar la cosa más en serio.”

En 1998, firman un contrato con Taste Media, sacan unos EP y un primer disco, Showbiz, en 1999, que será el principio de una ascensión realmente supersónica. En este primer disco ya se nota la marca del grupo, canciones intensas, potentes, líricas, saturadas de guitarras, de electrónica oprimente y estridente, un sentido de la paranoia, de lo épico, un soplo despeinante, las rupturas de tono y los ritmos melodramáticos. Ya se encuentra la mezcla entre las partituras de teclado radiofónico de Sunburn y la estridencia industrial de Uno. El disco Showbiz es un buen principio, pero es Origin of Symmetry, con órgano y Mellotron, que sale en 2001, que va a ser la revelación en las radios. Mucho más negro, más complejo, este disco tiene influencias clásicas mezcladas con ópera rock y experimentos sonoros y clásicos, como en Space Dementia, que sigue siendo la canción favorita de Bellamy. Un híbrido rock acaba de nacer, un monstruo glam con puntas estridentes, un grito de rabia en un mundo saturado, saturado de informaciones y de mentiras.

Dos años después, en el concierto de Bercy, el grupo da una bofetada tremenda al público con un espectáculo ensordecedor que arrastra los pies del suelo y un fervor religioso que no se había visto en directo desde Depeche Mode. Azúcar y ácido, las canciones incluyen riffs monumentales y dulce melancolía al piano. Desde entonces, Muse ha recibido un númoro de premios incalculable. Mejor grupo en directo, mejor prestación escénica... Son performers sin igual, producen solos un sonido con una potencia increíble. Es una misa gigante, una ceremonia ardiente con videoproyecciones cosmogónicas, luces y efectos especiales.

La orden del día : resistir.

Unos años más tarde, tocan delante de 80.000 personas en un estadio de Wembley llenísimo. ¿Hubieran podido imaginarlo? Dominic se acuerda : “Siempre hemos soñado cuando éramos jóvenes, a los 16 o 17 años, soñábamos con cosas grandes. En 1994, estuve en el festival de Reading por primera vez y me acuerdo habernos imaginado tocando en el escenario principal, eran sueños, aspiraciones. Miraba a Rage Against the Machine pensando “es realmente impresionante, tenemos que tocar aquí”, y luego lo hicimos. Pero hemos ido mucho más allá de lo que podíamos imaginar. Es contradictorio, lo soñábamos pero nos ha sorprendido también.”

El éxito empieza en Francia, un país con el que el grupo sigue teniendo una relación privilegiada. Sacan otros discos, casi uno cada dos años, Absolution en 2003 les hace pasar por el otro lado del mainstream por la fuerza. Paradójicamente, cuanto más complejas y épicas sean las canciones, más mística son las letras, y más éxito tienen. A partir de ahí, los fans de la primera hora se vuelven clandestinos porque es de mal gusto apreciar sus grandes órganos paranoicos. Muse también es una actitud, la de un Bellamy atormentado y extremadamente sensible, con una consigna : resistir. Las canciones hablan de emociones universales : rabia, frustración, deseo de absoluto. El grupo no hace concesiones. No le da miedo amenazar la imperadora Céline Dion con llevarla a los tribunales si utiliza el nombre de Muse para su residencia de Las Vegas. Dan un golpe y se van de Maverick, su sello discográfico americano, cuando quiere cambiar unas letras para ser más radio friendly. Consiguen crear un vínculo entre música sagrada y comercial sin hacer concesiones. Se puede escuchar un jam que hacen con los Streets en Internet, y al mismo tiempo su actuación en el Royal Albert Hall, en la que Bellamy resucitó el gran órgano inutilizado desde hacía años. Estos niños han construido un imperio sobre osamentas de la britpop y pintan un color muy peculiar, lejos de Radiohead a los que se les comparó durante mucho tiempo, sin razón. Y su estilo, fusión de prog y hard rock, música clásica y electrónica, se confirma. También se trata del disco que les permite pasar de unas salas de tamaño mediano a los estadios.

En 2003, Absolution es premiado muchas veces. El grupo toca, según él, su mejor concierto de todos los tiempos en el festival de Glastonbury en junio de 2004, delante de 60 000 personas. Durante este mismo concierto el padre del batería muere de un infarto. Bellamy habla del drama : “Este concierto fue la realización más importante de nuestra vida. La muerte del padre de Dom una hora después fue surrealista. Hemos apoyado a Dom, pero estuvo feliz de saber que su padre había asistido a este gran momento.” ¿Sigue pensando en su padre, que le llevó a tocar la guitarra cuando era niño? ¿Quién dijo que los niños construirían imperios sobre osamentas y se volverían faraones?

2006 es el año del lanzamiento de Black Holes and Revelations, que permite escuchar nuevas influencias, de Queen a Philip Glass, pasando por el electrofunk de Prince. Y luego el directo HAARP para recordar los dos conciertos de Wembley. Reciben decenas de premios. El gigantismo de los conciertos da una nueva dimensión al siguiente disco, el último, The Resistance, que se acaba con una mini sinfonía en tres partes, Exogenesis, sacado de las influencias clásicas de Bellamy. El secreto de su alquimia seguirá siendo un misterio, pero el soplo cada día es más grande. El trío empieza ahora su gira de estadios, con dos Stades de France, dos Wembley, Coachella, Glastonbury con Steve Wonder, sin olvidar casi todas las salas del mundo. Entonces, ¿preparados?

El ministerio de Muse

ROCK&FOLK : Vuestras giras son verdaderos maratones. ¿Cómo os preparáis?
Chris Wolstenholme : Más seriamente que antes. Cuanto éramos más jóvenes, cometíamos más errores, ya no (risas). Por mi parte, antes de empezar esta gira, he ido a hacer mucho deporte. Luego los conciertos son tan físicos que me mantienen en forma. Durante  diez años, estaba borracho durante las giras, pero he dejado de beber y de fumar, y ahora estoy más en forma que cuando tenía 25 años. Hay que tener cuidado porque la mente sigue siendo joven aunque el cuerpo envejezca, y nos damos cuenta de que no somos tan valientes como antes.
Matthew Bellamy : A veces vamos al gimnasio unas semanas antes de empezar, pero me da muchísima pereza y soy poco deportista. La primera semana de gira, en general estoy hecho polvo, luego ya nos adaptamos y nos acostumbramos. En realidad, aspiramos la energía del público, que espera algo muy grande. Con esta aspiración, nos alimentamos de sus expectativas, de esta tensión nerviosa, y las transformamos en energía. Necesito el público para estar en forma.

R&F : Y tú, Dominic, cuando vemos tu envergadura frágil, no sabemos de dónde sacas tu potencia para tocar. ¿Cuál es tu secreto?
Dominic Howard
(con una voz sepulcral) : La Fuerza viene del interior (risas)... No, no es una cuestión de fuerza física, cuando hay que tocar delante de 60 000 personas, el adrenalina da como una fuerza sobrenatural. Después de un concierto, nos encontramos electrizados y agotados, pero muy vivos mentalmente.

R&F : Este gigantismo de las giras ¿no es demasiado a veces?
Chris Wolstenholme :
Es enorme, pero nos gusta muchísimo. También somos conscientes de los límites, no podemos ir más allá que un estadio, si somos razonables : ¡más de 100 000 personas, ya no sería un concierto! Nos gusta mucho tocar en estadios como Wembley o el Parque de los Príncipes, es muy impresionante. Tocar en un estadio no es algo muy previsible, aunque tengas un ego y una ambición desmesurados. Cuando empezamos, íbamos a ver a grupos que tocaban delante de 2000 personas, y nos parecía enorme. Muy rápido hemos llegado a un nivel muy superior. De repente ya estábamos en salas muy grandes y estadios, casi sin darnos cuenta... Para los dos Stades de France, estábamos muy nerviosos. En principio, sólo teníamos pensado tocar una vez, y tampoco estaba seguro. El Parque de los Príncipes ya eran 25 000 personas, pero 80 000, ¡había que encontrarlas! Pero al final todo se vendió muy rápido. Por eso pusimos otra fecha, y las entradas se agotaron enseguida...
Matthew Bellamy : Con conciertos de esta envergadura, tenemos mucha presión. Cuando estamos en forma y en confianza, está bien, no hay nada mejor que sentir que podemos alcanzar un nivel muy alto, dando mucho al público, y es lo que pasa la mayoría de las veces. Pero también pasa que podemos ser cansados y esto te lleva al otro lado, se puede volver una pesadilla. Yo lo veo como una profesión de alto riesgo. Hay corolarios. Estas giras han tenido un impacto muy negativo sobre nuestras vidas personales. Ahora llegamos a un punto en el que tenemos que volver a encontrar un equilibrio. Cuando te das cuenta de que ya no controlas tu vida privada es cuando ya te cansas. Cuando estás lejos, que tienes problemas con tu novia, por ejemplo, o tu ex novia en mi caso, y que no estás para resolverlos porque estás en el otro lado del mundo, es problemático. El revés de estas giras es que muy a menudo, sacrificas tu vida privada.

R&F : Para esta gira, que ilustra un disco bastante complejo, ¿tenéis previsto tocar con una orquesta sinfónica? ¿Podéis darnos algunos detalles sobre el show?
Matthew Bellamy :
Para la orquesta, lo hemos pensado, pero la logística para traer a tantos músicos es demasiado complicada. Nos enfrentamos ahí a unos límites, y los shows ya son muy desmesurados... Creo que nunca podré dar la cara con el estrés de una orquesta sinfónica (risas). Por eso, no sé muy bien si vamos a tocar Exogenesis en directo. Vamos a empezar a ensayar para ver si lo podemos hacer, sintetizando las secciones de cuerdas...
Dominic Howard : Tenemos buenas sensaciones, estamos construyendo algo muy grande, estructuras piramidales inspiradas de los ministerios de 1984 de George Orwell, será el ministerio de Muse, con muchas proyecciones, una locura.

R&F :¿Qué podéis contestar a las acusasiones de megalomanía en cuanto a vuestros shows faraónicos?
Chris Wolstenholme :
La megalomanía nos da igual. Black Holes and Revelations nos llevó al nivel de los estadios, fue un nuevo capítulo en nuestra historia. La talla del directo influencia también las grabaciones en el estudio. Tocar en el Parque de los Príncipes o en Wembley influyó sobre las canciones del último disco, como para Guiding Light. Existe un feeling estadio, cierta amplitud.
Matthew Bellamy : Cierto, pero creo que también nos gustaría volver a un nivel más sencillo. Hacemos esto para probar nuestros límites, ver hasta dónde podemos llegar en la desmesura. Es algo experimental. Pero nos gustaría volver a salas más pequeñas.

R&F : ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre tocar en un estadio y en una sala más pequeña?
Matthew Bellamy :
Se trata de una diferencia de intimidad. En una sala pequeña, se puede ver las caras, se puede cantar una canción a alguien en particular en el público, existe una conexión. Somos menos dramáticos, menos épicos, más sencillos. No podemos tocar el mismo repertorio en un estadio y en una sala pequeña. Take a Bow, por ejemplo, que es muy épica, por ejemplo, no funciona muy bien en una sala, se adapta a los estadios.
Chris Wolstenholme : Si, es muy diferente. En un estadio, estamos como sumergidos, es una emoción muy grande y muy desgarradora, nos sentimos orgullosos. Cuando tocamos en Wembley, estaba totalmente sumergido por la emoción cuando me subí al escenario. Estaban todas nuestras familias, en el box real. En aquel momento, todo se me vino a la cabeza, nuestros comienzos, la primera vez que firmamos con una discográfica, y pensé que finalmente, no había pasado tanto tiempo. Un concierto pequeño te da energía pura y dura, hay como electricidad que pasa con el público, se ven las reacciones, hay un vínculo. Se ven los individuos, mientras que en un estadio, es un trance colectivo.

R&F : Hablando de trance, ¿cómo podéis explicar tanto el fervor como el rechazo que provoca Muse?
Matthew Bellamy :
Es dificil de entender, pero este tipo de reacciones extremas se crean cuando algo es un poco sorprendente o peculiar. ¡A lo mejor hay gente que no soporta las frecuencias de mi voz! Depende del tamaño de las orejas (risas).
Chris Wolstenholme : La música es extrema, por eso conlleva reacciones extremas. Personalmente, prefiero que sea así que ser un grupo que vende mucho siendo sólo correcto. Prefiero que haya poca gente a la que le guste muchísimo mi música que haya mucha gente que sólo la encuentre agradable. No hacemos discos de los que se dejan en una mesa del salón sin escucharlos. Nuestros fans son hardcore, tienen todos los discos, los singles, los bootlegs, compran camisetas, vienen a vernos a cinco conciertos diferentes en la misma gira. A veces miro los foros de fans, es una locura, ¡se pasan días y noches hablando de nosotros!

R&F : El éxito viene mucho de la identificación de vuestros fans a las canciones. ¿ Qué dicen por ser tan peculiares?
Matthew Bellamy :
Creo que lo que hay es una sinceridad acerca del mundo tal cómo es desde hace diez años, la manera con la que se presenta a través de la educación y de los medios de comunicación y la manera con la que la gente lo vive. Existe una división. Creo que la mayoría de nuestras canciones tratan de todo esto. Nuestro público se identifica con esta confusión con respeto al mundo, al deseo de cambio.

R&F : ¿Siempre habéis sentido esta confusión?
Matthew Bellamy :
Yo creo que sí. Cuando iba a la escuela, ya no me sentía en fase con lo que estudiaba, siempre lo ponía todo en cuestión. Tenía más confianza en lo que sentía que en lo que me enseñaban. Esto no ha cambiado, hoy en día tengo el instinto de rebelarme contra las cosas establecidas. Hay algo que va mal en este mundo, y hay que resistir. Nunca me he sentido en confianza con la información que se nos impone. Siempre he tenido una parte rebelde frente a los pensamientos dominantes, me fío de mis emociones profundas. Pero bueno, a lo mejor sólo es un desorden mental (risas).

R&F : ¿Seguís sorprendidos por el fervor y la dedicación de vuestros fans?
Matthew Bellamy :
Muchísimo. Me sigue sorprendiendo cuando veo a fans que se han tatuado el nombre del grupo o nuestros nombres. Cada vez pienso que nunca nos podremos separar. Te impone cierta responsabilidad. Tenemos una relación muy fuerte con nuestros fans, por eso seguimos juntos, no nos vamos a separar por una disputa o un humor, o porque uno de nosotros se volvería junky, porque tenemos una relación demasiado fuerte que queremos entretener. Esta responsabilidad es muy sana y es una forma de preservarnos.

R&F : ¿Qué decís a los que dicen que Muse es un grupo de prog? ¿Os pone nerviosos?
Matthew Bellamy :
Sí, cada vez lo oigo más. Pienso que sólo es una parte de lo que somos. Tenemos partes prog, es el aspecto complejo laberíntico de nuestras canciones, pero muchas de nuestras canciones tienen un feeling pop, como Starlight o Time is Running Out. Es verdad que hay canciones inspiradas del rock progresivo, pero si miramos nuestros singles, no es el caso.
Dominic Howard (haciendo muecas) : El rock progresivo, yo lo asocio a los años setenta, a Pink Floyd, Genesis. No me gusta este rock fusión y no pienso que nos haya influenciado. El término progresivo no es peyorativo, hacemos arreglos complejos, nos gusta dejar las canciones para que se pierdan en meandros. Pero al final, es un término que sirve de cajón de sastre para describir una música que sale de la cortapisa tradicional de la canción pop cuadrada de tres minutos.

Francia, el primer país.

R&F : ¿Cuál es vuestro mejor recuerdo de gira?
Dominic Howard :
Tenemos muchos, pero sobre todo recuerdos olvidados (risas). No me acuerdo de muchas cosas de la gira Black Holes and Revelations. Wembley fue inolvidable, el concierto más enorme que hemos hecho fuera de los festivales delante de 75 000 personas. Cuando hemos tocado Blackout, dos gimnastas volaron por encima de la gente con balones gigantes, fue magnífico. Desde detrás de mi batería, miraba el espectáculo y el público como un espectador. Se habían cambiado los papeles.
Matthew Bellamy : El año 2007 fue genial, y la gira australiana. Es difícil escoger un momento en particular. Wembley y Glastonbury fueron momentos increíbles, por supuesto. Y también en Saint-Malo, en la Route du Rock, hace diez años, delante de 10 000 personas. En aquella época, fue nuestro concierto más grande, un choc. Nunca olvidaré Saint-Malo...

R&F : Es verdad que vuestra carrera empezó realmente en Francia. ¿Porqué esta relación tan peculiar con un país no anglófono?
Chris Wolstenholme :
No lo sé. Nos ha sorprendido. Es verdad que en Francia, desde muy pronto hemos tenido éxito, cuando todavía no éramos famosos. En 2003, habíamos tocado un pequeño concierto en París organizado por Oui FM. Era gratuito y 500 personas asistieron. Fue la primera vez que firmamos autógrafos, fotos, la primera vez que nos sentimos como verdaderas rock stars. Fue el primer país en el que tuvimos éxito. Y luego, en la Route du Rock, fue impresionante. Para nosotros, Francia fue el primer país en coger el tren, los otros países han tardado más.

R&F : ¿Tenéis otro disco previsto, o a lo mejor un disco más estrictamente clásico?
Matthew Bellamy :
Un disco de clásico, puede ser, pero no sé si sería con Muse, a lo mejor en un proyecto paralelo. He escrito canciones, pero no creo que tengamos que darnos demasiado prisa para sacar otro disco, necesitamos un descanso. Además, ahora empezamos la ruta, tenemos que hogueras que quemar...

Los faraones vuelven al asalto de las pirámides. Entonces, ¿qué? Muse, ¿love it or hate it?


*

Desconectado Beibi

  • Administrando muserismo con arte 2012
  • 8804
  • 357
  • You’ve been...a very...very...naughty little girl
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #8 en: Mar, 29 de Jun del 2010, a las 19:23:48 »
Gracias :)

*

Desconectado mer

  • Encantadora de museros'11
  • 1352
  • 46
  • the sound of my soul
Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #9 en: Mar, 29 de Jun del 2010, a las 22:45:43 »
Mil  gracias  :palmas: :palmas:

Citar
Nuestros fans son hardcore, tienen todos los discos, los singles, los bootlegs, compran camisetas, vienen a vernos a cinco conciertos diferentes en la misma gira. A veces miro los foros de fans, es una locura, ¡se pasan días y noches hablando de nosotros!

Porque dirá algo asi?  de donde lo habrá sacado?  :cheesy:


Citar
R&F : ¿Siempre habéis sentido esta confusión?
Matthew Bellamy : Yo creo que sí. Cuando iba a la escuela, ya no me sentía en fase con lo que estudiaba, siempre lo ponía todo en cuestión. Tenía más confianza en lo que sentía que en lo que me enseñaban. Esto no ha cambiado, hoy en día tengo el instinto de rebelarme contra las cosas establecidas. Hay algo que va mal en este mundo, y hay que resistir. Nunca me he sentido en confianza con la información que se nos impone. Siempre he tenido una parte rebelde frente a los pensamientos dominantes, me fío de mis emociones profundas. Pero bueno, a lo mejor sólo es un desorden mental (risas).

Diosss..esto es lo que mas me gusta de muse... esto lo copio de mi, fijo....


Re: Entrevista: Rock & Folk Magazine junio 2010
« Respuesta #10 en: Mar, 29 de Jun del 2010, a las 22:55:15 »
Citar
Seguís sorprendidos por el fervor y la dedicación de vuestros fans?
Matthew Bellamy : Muchísimo. Me sigue sorprendiendo cuando veo a fans que se han tatuado el nombre del grupo o nuestros nombres. Cada vez pienso que nunca nos podremos separar. Te impone cierta responsabilidad. Tenemos una relación muy fuerte con nuestros fans, por eso seguimos juntos, no nos vamos a separar por una disputa o un humor, o porque uno de nosotros se volvería junky, porque tenemos una relación demasiado fuerte que queremos entretener. Esta responsabilidad es muy sana y es una forma de preservarnos.

esa es la actitud!!  :happyhand:

To Boldly Go...

 

TinyPortal © 2005-2012